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atmospheric conditions

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  • Airborne atmospheric measurements from core and non-core instrument suites data on board the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) Masin Twin-Otter aircraft collected for the Microphysics of Antarctic Clouds (MAC) project.

  • Airborne atmospheric measurements from core instrument suite data on board the FAAM BAE-146 aircraft collected for FAAM Test, Calibration, Training and Non-science Flights and other non-specified flight projects project.

  • This dataset contains high resolution measurements of temperature, humidity and wind fluctuations from Summit Station, Greenland. These measurements and derived quantities can be used to estimate turbulent fluxes using eddy covariance. The data are collected at 10 Hz resolution and statistical properties have been calculated over both 15-minute and 30-minute flux averaging intervals (separate files). The measurements are located at two levels on the 15 m tower: - ace-flux-1 are the lower level (~2 m above surface) measurements, from a Metek uSonic-3 scientific 3D sonic anemometer and Licor Li-7500 gas analyzer. - ace-flux-2 are the higher level measurements (~14 m above surface), from a Metek uSonic-3 scientific 3D sonic anemometer only (no humidity measurements). Also see the ICECAPS-ACE: surface turbulent heat flux estimates data product for estimations of latent and sensible heat flux calculated from these components. These data were collected as part of the joint Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) and US National Science Foundation (NSF) -funded Integrated Characterisation of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric state, and Precipitation at Summit - Aerosol Cloud Experiment (ICECAPS-ACE) project.

  • Forecasting Rainfall exploiting new data Assimilation techniques and Novel observations of Convection (FRANC): Ensemble member output from Unified Model runs as described in Flack et al. (2018): Convective-Scale Perturbation Growth Across the Spectrum of Convective Regimes, Monthly Weather Review, 146, 387-405 The dataset contains ensemble run output from 36 hour long runs under different model set ups (see details below) for 6 case studies (see Flack et al. 2018 for greater detail). The case studies (and model output available in the dataset) chosen related to a spectrum of 'convective adjustment time scales', defined as the ratio between the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and its rate of release at the convective scale. 'control' run files contain large scale rainfall rates and amounts whilst the 'control_multilevel' files contain various parameters on various levels, including mean sea level pressure, zonal, meridional and vertical wind components, specific humidity and temperature. - Case A: 20th April 2012, part of the Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution of Convective Storms (DYMECS) field experiment (Stein et al. 2015), showing typical conditions for scattered showers in the United Kingdom. - Case B: 12 August 2013, for a case where a surface low was situated over Scandinavia and the Azores high was beginning to build, leading to persistent northwesterly flow. - Case C: 23rd July 2013, relating to the fifth intensive observation period (IOP 5) of the Convective Precipitation Experiment (COPE; Leon et al. 2016). A low pressure system was centered to the west of the United Kingdom with several fronts ahead of the main center, which later decayed. - Case D: 2nd August 2013, covering IOP 10 of the COPE field campaign, with convection initiating at 1100 UTC. The synoptic situation shows a low pressure system centered to the west of Scotland, which led to southwesterly winds and a convergence line being set up along the North Cornish coastline (in southwest England). - Case E: 27th July 2013, covers the period of IOP 7 of the COPE field campaign where two mesoscale convective systems (MCS) influenced the U.K.’s weather throughout the forecast period. - Case F: 5th August 2013, was chosen for the complex situation for considering convective-scale perturbation grown and a second case driven by the boundary conditions as seen during IOP 12 of the COPE campaign A brief description of the model run IDs and model setup is given below. The model used to create these ensembles is the Met Office Unified Model (MetUM). The United Kingdom Variable resolution (UKV) configuration is used, and so the data has a grid spacing of approximately 1.5 km. This was run at version 8.2 and run with the MetUM Graphical User Interface (GUI). run ID: xkyib This is the control experiment and everything is kept identical to the operational running of this configuration of the MetUM. run ID: xldef Here the Gaussian potential temperature perturbations are added into the model. Full details of the perturbation method are described in Flack et al. (2018) Convective-Scale Perturbation Growth Across the Spectrum of Convective Regimes, Monthly Weather Review, 146, 387-405, however a brief overview is given below: A Gaussian distribution (defined using random numbers between +/- 1 at each grid point, with the seed determined by the time the model is ran) is created at every grid point in the domain. A superposition is created and rescaled to 0.1 K so as to be an appropriate amplitude for boundary layer noise. Each of the Gaussian distributions have a standard deviation of 9km so as to be added onto an appropriate scale for the model. The perturbations are added in at a model hybrid height of 261.6 m (approximately the 8th model level).

  • This dataset contains air sample measurements of isotopic d13C methane. The measurements were collected using regular flask samples at Chacaltya Observatory Station, Bolivia. The samples were analysed Royal Holloway University of London using continuous flow gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-GC/IRMS). These data were collected as part of the Methane Observations and Yearly Assessments (MOYA) project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) (NE/N016211/1).

  • This dataset contains air sample measurements of isotopic d13C methane. The measurements were collected using regular flask samples around Hong Kong Island. The samples were analysed Royal Holloway University of London using continuous flow gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-GC/IRMS). These data were collected as part of the Methane Observations and Yearly Assessments (MOYA) project funded by the Natural Environment Research Council (NERC) (NE/N016211/1).

  • This dataset includes a high-resolution gridded model hindcast simulation of the Antarctic Peninsula during the period 1998-2017, produced using the Met Office Unified Model (UM). Variables included in the dataset include near-surface meteorological variables like temperature and relative humidity, atmospheric profiles such as winds and humidity on pressure levels, cloud properties such as liquid/ice water paths, surface energy balance terms such as radiative and turbulent fluxes and surface fields such as surface meltwater production. All variables are outputted at 3- or 6-hourly intervals. Variables are separated into individual netCDF files, which are either two dimensional (for example surface for near-surface meteorological fields) or three dimensional (for example atmospheric profiles), over time. The region covered is the central and northern Antarctic Peninsula, centred on the Larsen C ice shelf. The simulations are gridded on rotated pole coordinates and cover the period 01-01-1998 00:00 UTC to31-12-2017 23:59 UTC. A dynamically downscaled regional (limited area) version of the UM is run in atmosphere-only mode at 4.0 km horizontal grid spacing, with 70 vertical levels and a 100 second time step for the inner domain. The model is re-initialised from ERA-Interim reanalysis data every 12 hours, and the time series is produced by concatenating the t+12 hour to t+24 hr segments of each integration into a continuous time series. Specifics of the model configurations and parameterisations used to produce the simulations are documented in Gilbert et al. (2020) (doi: 10.1002/qj.3753). These simulations were produced as part of the doctoral work of E. Gilbert, and was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council through the EnvEast Doctoral Training Partnership (grant number NE/L002582/1). E. Gilbert also acknowledges the use of the MONSooN system, a collaborative facility supplied under the Joint Weather and Climate Research Programme, a strategic partnership between the Met Office and the Natural Environment Research Council.

  • This dataset contains surface aerosol size distribution (0.25 to 6.5 μm diameter) measured on the roof of the Summit Station Greenland using a GRIMM SKYOPC 1.129 Optical Particle Counter. Data are 1 minute averages concatenated into monthly files. These data were collected as part of the joint Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) and US National Science Foundation (NSF) -funded Integrated Characterisation of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric state, and Precipitation at Summit - Aerosol Cloud Experiment (ICECAPS-ACE) project.

  • This dataset contains the distance to the snow surface from the lowest level of instruments on the 15 m tower at Summit Station, Greenland, detected by a sonic-ranging sensor. Data are collected every 10 minutes and concatenated into monthly files. These data were collected as part of the joint Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) and US National Science Foundation (NSF) -funded Integrated Characterisation of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric state, and Precipitation at Summit - Aerosol Cloud Experiment (ICECAPS-ACE) project.

  • This dataset contains surface snow surface brightness temperature measured on the roof of the Summit Station Greenland detected by an infrared radiation thermometer (KT15 Infrared Temperature Sensor). Data are 1 minute averages concatenated into monthly files. These data were collected as part of the joint Natural Environmental Research Council (NERC) and US National Science Foundation (NSF) -funded Integrated Characterisation of Energy, Clouds, Atmospheric state, and Precipitation at Summit - Aerosol Cloud Experiment (ICECAPS-ACE) project.